KCRW Harold Pinter’s The Homecoming, currently being revived by Pacific Resident Theater,

This is Anthony Byrnes Opening the Curtain on LA theater for KCRW. Harold Pinter's The Homecoming, currently being revived by Pacific Resident Theater, is a tough play to do right. Chances are even if you only walked by a drama class in college, you've got a copy of the paperback on your bookshelf staring back at you. Without cracking it in years, you remember - like Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? , Read More

Pinter’s “The Homecoming” at Venice’s Pacific Resident Theatre!

Posted: 06/05/2015 5:40 pm EDT Updated: 06/05/2015 5:59 pm EDT Harold Pinter was an Englishman who wrote powerful, controversial plays....so successfully that he was honored with a Nobel Laureate for Literature in 2005. I had the honor of meeting the dapper, delightful playwright in 1967 when I was production head of an ABC film company, Palomar, and we made a movie in England of his early play, "The Birthday Party." Although Read More

The stars certainly align in Pacific Resident Theatre’s production of Pinter’s TheHomecoming

The stars certainly align in Pacific Resident Theatre's production of Pinter's #TheHomecoming The pith of Harold Pinter is in the subtext. Innocuous interchanges – about a pilfered cheese roll, a ticking clock, a piece of fried bread – take on layers of meaning and menace that transcend the infrastructure of text. That is, given the right combination of director and actors. Together, they must dig in and do their homework in order Read More

The Homecoming Reviewed by Bill Raden

For writers and actors of a certain age, the cultural revolution known as the 1960s begins in 1958. That year saw the premiere of The Birthday Party, the play perhaps most responsible for crystalizing its generation’s disenchantment with, and distrust of language in the elliptical ambiguities, pregnant pauses, paradoxical contradictions and ironic sense of menace that quickly earned the adjective “Pinteresque.” And while Harold Pinter productions have become rarer in recent Read More

LA Weekly: The Homecoming

"Why don't you shut up, you daft prat?" says Lenny (Jason Downs, resembling young Malcolm McDowell) to his father, Max (Jude Ciccolella), in Guillermo Cienfuegos' top-flight revival of Harold Pinter's 1965 comedy The Homecoming at Pacific Resident Theatre. He doesn't say it in a moment of fury. It's just part of the East London family's nonchalant repartee, spoken while reading a newspaper on a sofa. Dad calls all of his Read More

Los Angeles Theater Review: THE HOMECOMING

Pacific Resident Theatre, Marilyn Fox has got hold of the rights to 1965′s The Homecoming and handed the reins to producer Elspeth A. Weingarten and director Guillermo Cienfuegos, and that’s the exact right way to keep the name of Pinter on the lips of the people who should be saying “Pinter.” Like me. Philosophy professor Teddy (Trent Dawson) brings his wife of six years and mother of his three boys Ruth Read More

Cherry Orchard a Comedy and Tragedy that is Worthy of a Young Audience

Presented at the Pacific Resident Theatre in Venice, California through September, Julius West’s translation of Anton Chekhov’s “The Cherry Orchard” maintains the true intent of the playwright as a Comedy mixed with Tragedy. The play is performed in traditional set and costume, but the language is one relatable today to the modern man with themes of Money, Love and Freedom. The play centers on the Russian aristocrat Ranevskaya (Artistic Director Marilyn Read More

Los Angeles Theater Review: THE UNFRYABLE MEATNESS OF BEING (Pacific Resident Theatre)

Los Angeles Theater Review: THE UNFRYABLE MEATNESS OF BEING (Pacific Resident Theatre) by Tom Chaits on August 29, 2014 in Theater-Los Angeles Post image for Los Angeles Theater Review: THE UNFRYABLE MEATNESS OF BEING (Pacific Resident Theatre) MORE MEAT If you are one of the many theatergoers who caught Pacific Resident Theatre’s production of Out There on Fried Meat Ridge Road (and possibly the special Christmas follow-up) during its unprecedented 6-month run, then you’ll likely Read More

STAGE RAW: The Unfryable Meatness of Being

The Unfryable Meatness of Being Reviewed by Paul Birchall Pacific Resident Theatre Through Sept. 7 RECOMMENDED: Playwright Keith Stevenson’s delightfully quirky comedy is the third installment in a series of plays -- a triptych of white trash comedies, each an episode involving the down-market residents of a flophouse motel in backwoods West Virginia. And what delights a Los Angeles audience more than laughing at the great, unwashed yokels and inbreeds who are doofy enough Read More

WILLCALL: THE UNFRYABLE MEATNESS OF BEING by Keith Stevenson

THE UNFRYABLE MEATNESS OF BEING by Keith Stevenson It takes a certain sense of humor to appreciate the wit that propels the dialogue in this unique comedy. If you've ever chuckled over a good redneck joke, it will fit you like a comfy pair of overalls. Personally, I thought it was hilarious! It takes place in the mountains of West Virginia, an area where, I don't think, anyone ever qualified for Read More